Tri-Cities Local Immigration Partnership

The Tri-Cities Local Immigration Partnership (TCLIP) brings community leaders and organizations together to review the needs of its newest residents and identify means to facilitate immigrant settlement and integration. The ultimate goal of the TCLIP is to develop welcoming and inclusive communities where both long term residents and newcomers feel a sense of belonging and attachment.

Find out more about the TCLIP here.

Featured Resources

Download and read our latest reports, research, and publications.

Find Immigrant Service Providers in the Tri-Cities

Did you know that Port-Moody, Port-Coquitlam and Coquitlam have many programs and services to help newcomers settle in their new homes. If you are new to the community and would like support, search for programs and services in your area.

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To find services in the Tri-Cities click on the service categories below. You can select one or all to see results in the area.

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News & Events

Temporary Foreign Worker Program Launches Global Skills Strategy

By McMillan LLP, Lexology |

In a recent article, entitled Canada’s Global Skills Strategy to launch June 12, 2017, we advised readers of the Government of Canada’s intention to launch a new Global Skills Strategy aimed at helping companies that are making a significant investment in Canada attract the specialized global talent they need to innovate and grow by providing faster and more predictable immigration service. read more…

London mosque attack suspect made anti-Muslim slurs: neighbours

By Paisley Dodds and Maria Cheng, Globe and Mail |

Neighbours and acquaintances described the man who allegedly attacked a group of Muslim worshippers as an unemployed lout who was drinking heavily and making anti-Muslim remarks in the days before the attack — details to be closely examined as the investigation widened Tuesday.

The attack unfolded Monday when the alleged assailant, identified by British media as 47-year-old Darren Osborne, drove a rental van into a crowd of Muslim worshippers outside a mosque in the north London neighbourhood of Finsbury Park, an area with a significant Muslim population. The larger Finsbury Park Mosque, which was once associated with several extremist preachers before it was shut down and reformed, is located nearby. Nine people were injured in the attack.

One man also died after slipping outside the Muslim Welfare House as evening prayers concluded for the holy month of Ramadan. Makram Ali, 51, died at the scene in his daughter’s arms. She told neighbours that the van had “run over his legs.”

Edward Gardiner, who lives in the alleged assailant’s neighbourhood outside the Welsh capital of Cardiff some 150 miles from where the attack occurred, said he called police early Sunday morning to report a man who appeared to be drunk sprawled inside a parked rental van. He said the man appeared to be sleeping across the vehicle’s front three seats with the door open. On Saturday, Osborne had been thrown out of the Hollybush pub after drinking heavily and getting into an argument.

“I could smell alcohol on him and he was grunting and groaning,” Gardiner said. “I poked him but he didn’t respond so I called (police). I didn’t think anything about it but then I saw the news reports, and it was the same guy, the same van.”

British authorities have said the attacker, who is being held on terror charges, was not known to them or associated with extremist groups, but investigators are exploring reported anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim remarks. Police are also looking into a statement made by his family that he was “troubled for a long time.” Police, who haven’t formally named him, said Tuesday they could not release details on whether the attacker was drunk at the time of the attack or whether he was on other medication.

In a statement on behalf of the family, Osborne’s nephew, Ellis Osborne, said they were devastated for the families of the victims but said that his uncle was not a racist. Osborne’s sister, Nicola, said her brother had been “troubled for a long time.”

The attack, which followed three Islamic State group-inspired attacks in Britain, drew criticism from the Muslim community, which said police were slow to call the incident a “terror attack.” They also complained that a recent spike in hate crimes targeting Muslims has garnered little attention. Since the London Bridge attack earlier this month, police say hate crimes against Muslims have increased five-fold.

The attacks, which have left 34 dead and scores wounded, have polarized some sections of Britain, already divided over the decision to leave the European Union in a vote that was largely fueled by racist, anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim rhetoric fanned by right-leaning tabloids.

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Demographics

Download demographics details on each community in the Tri-Cities.

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

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