Tri-Cities Local Immigration Partnership

The Tri-Cities Local Immigration Partnership (TCLIP) brings community leaders and organizations together to review the needs of its newest residents and identify means to facilitate immigrant settlement and integration. The ultimate goal of the TCLIP is to develop welcoming and inclusive communities where both long term residents and newcomers feel a sense of belonging and attachment.

Find out more about the TCLIP here.

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Find Immigrant Service Providers in the Tri-Cities

Did you know that Port-Moody, Port-Coquitlam and Coquitlam have many programs and services to help newcomers settle in their new homes. If you are new to the community and would like support, search for programs and services in your area.

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To find services in the Tri-Cities click on the service categories below. You can select one or all to see results in the area.

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News & Events

Toughen literacy standards to boost immigrant success

By Asian Pacific Post |

Strong literacy skills improve new immigrants’ employability and earnings capacity. But immigrant literacy skills in Canada lag non-immigrants despite the large proportion of immigrants with university degrees, according the 2012 OECD Programme for International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC). read more…

B.C. college faculty feel pressure to ‘pass’ foreign students

By Douglas Todd, Vancouver Sun |

Veteran college English instructors are routinely receiving passionate, imploring pleas for passing grades from the international students who increasingly fill their classes.

The foreign students’ emotion-filled emails and in-office appeals, often issued in jumbled English, invariably aim to cajole faculty at Langara College and other institutions into giving them a break, so they will be able to move on from their mandatory courses in English literature.

The foreign students often maintain their entire future depends on passing the English course.

Langara College has experienced a five-fold rise in foreign students since 2014, but two English literature and composition instructors say the college’s over-reliance on international fees is not working for many high-stressed foreign students, their anxious offshore parents or for shortchanged domestic students.

Langara College English instructors Peter Babiak and Anne Moriarty are among a small number of Canadian higher education officials who are ending their silence to raise concerns about the expanding business of international education, which now brings 130,000 foreign students to B.C., mostly Metro Vancouver.

“I do feel sorry for the (international) students, of course, but that’s not really the point. When I assign grades, presumably I need to be objective and not let emotions get in the way,” says Babiak, who has been teaching at Langara since 2002.

Like many faculty at universities and colleges, Babiak and Moriarty feel pressure to wave through the full-fee-paying foreign students, especially in mandatory first-year English literature courses, even if they lack fluency in English.

“There is a booming industry dedicated to helping students jump through English-language hoops, which teachers like me everywhere work hard to defend. Being part of this is weighing heavily on my conscience,” said Moriarty.

Read more

Statscan revises census data to show decline in English speakers in Quebec

By Jordan Press, Globe and Mail |

Quebec’s anglophone population is declining, rather than booming, Statistics Canada said Thursday as the agency officially corrected a census finding that stoked political fires in Quebec’s emotionally charged language debate.

The change is the result of a computer error that recorded some 55,000 people in last year’s census as English speakers, when they really had French as their mother tongue. Correcting the mistake cut the increase in the anglophone population in half and pushed the francophone population up by more than 145,000 between 2011 and 2016.

Statistics Canada officials suggested the revisions did little to change the overall narrative captured in the census that showed an increase in the number of French speakers in the country, largely driven by Quebec.

The country’s revised bilingualism rate dropped to 17.9 per cent from 18 per cent, but remains at an all-time high.

The census data originally indicated roughly one-half of the 57,325 increase in Quebec’s anglophones over five years came from outside of the Montreal, a finding that puzzled experts, given trend lines and other information like school enrolment figures that pointed in the opposition direction.

What officials found was that a mistake in the online prompts for 61,000 respondents who did a follow-up step when they failed to complete the questionnaire and then had their answered flipped. A panel of outside experts reviewed the corrections before Statistics Canada released the figures almost a week after publicly reporting the mistake.

About 40 per cent of the wrongly classified responses were in Montreal.

Jean-Pierre Corbeil, who heads up the census language division at Statistics Canada, said the changes were more dramatically felt in communities with small English-speaking populations. In Quebec City, instead of some 6,400 anglophones residing in the city, there were roughly 660.

Statistics Canada now says anglophones make up 7.5 per cent of Quebec’s population, rather than 8.1 per cent, and that English as a mother tongue declined by two-tenths of a percentage point in the overall share of the population between 2011 and 2016, instead of an increase of four-tenths of a percentage point, as first reported.

“From a community standpoint, these things are quite significant,” said Jack Jedwab, executive vice-president of the Association for Canadian Studies, who first flagged the issue. “So I’m not following in terms of the way it’s being communicated that you can describe this as minimal in any way or a slight decrease to use those words.”

Jedwab is asking the chief statistician to use the upcoming releases to do a long-term review of Quebec’s anglophone and francophone populations to better understand how immigration and interprovincial migration has affected their numbers.

The originally reported jump in English-language speakers caused emotional ripples in Quebec, with provincial politicians talking about legislative means to ensure the survival of the French language in the province.

Read more

Demographics

Download demographics details on each community in the Tri-Cities.

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

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