Tri-Cities Local Immigration Partnership

The Tri-Cities Local Immigration Partnership (TCLIP) brings community leaders and organizations together to review the needs of its newest residents and identify means to facilitate immigrant settlement and integration. The ultimate goal of the TCLIP is to develop welcoming and inclusive communities where both long term residents and newcomers feel a sense of belonging and attachment.

Find out more about the TCLIP here.

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Did you know that Port-Moody, Port-Coquitlam and Coquitlam have many programs and services to help newcomers settle in their new homes. If you are new to the community and would like support, search for programs and services in your area.

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News & Events

B.C. labour income remains strong in 2017

By Bryan Yu, Business in Vancouver |

Despite easing in July, B.C.’s labour income remained solid to start 2017’s second half. Average weekly earnings sat at $941 in July, down 0.1% from June but up 3.3% year-over-year. Similarly, month-to-month non-farm payroll counts edged down but rose 3.1% from a year ago. In both cases, B.C. led all provinces in year-over-year growth, which was led by forestry and logging, utilities and mining/oil and gas in the goods sector, and transportation and warehousing, real estate and leasing, and accommodations/food services in services. While various factors contribute to headline weekly earnings, including sector composition and hours worked, the fixed-weight hourly index points suggest that most of the increase is underlying wage inflation. A tight labour market observed in low unemployment is lifting B.C. wages.

Non-farm payrolls climbed across sectors. On the goods front, mining/oil and gas employment rose 12.5%, while construction and utilities are up significantly. Meanwhile, service-sector leaders include tech jobs, tourism-oriented arts/recreation and accommodations/food services.

Increased wage earnings and job growth point to a stellar year for labour income gains, contributing to personal income growth of 7% this year and a 5% increase in 2018.

B.C. population growth is healthy, climbing 0.35%. Seasonally adjusted July-over-July annual population rose 1.3% (59,500 persons) to 4.82 million persons. That aligned with 2016 and near the upper end of the range observed since 2000.

While the overarching trend is solid, migration patterns have shifted. The net interprovincial migration trend has declined with a modest drop in inflows and higher outflow. Cumulative net July-to-July interprovincial migration came in at 16,100 persons compared with 26,570 a year ago. Increased outflow of B.C. residents to Ontario, Alberta and Quebec and decreased inflows from these provinces drove the downshift. Strengthening economies across the country and lower real estate values have lessened the attraction of the “Left Coast.”

In contrast, net international migration continued the erratic upward trend seen since 2015. Full-year international gains reached 36,682 persons, up 35% from 2016. However, this was almost entirely the result of a surge in net non-permanent residents following net declines in the previous two years. While factors such as rising student populations and other temporary-status workers contribute, refugee/humanitarian inflows and timing of status are likely drivers. •

Bryan Yu is deputy chief economist at Central 1 Credit Union

Read more

Demographics

Download demographics details on each community in the Tri-Cities.

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

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