‘Every immigrant parent wants to do best, but what is best?’

By Lisa Quen, York Region | A couple of weeks after Ayesha Singh and her husband Bikram arrived in Canada from India about a year ago, their young son Sumair developed a mild fever. She gave him medicine prescribed that had been prescribed by pediatrician in India but the fever kept recurring every couple of hours. It was the weekend and their new doctor in Canada was unavailable. Not knowing where to turn, Singh was becoming more concerned. “I didn’t know who to turn to for help as I didn’t know many people here. Back home, one has a support network of friends and family to turn to. I just needed to speak to an expert on what I could do to manage the situation till I could go see a doctor the next day,” Singh said. “Knowing that it was not an emergency, I was not sure if I could take him to a hospital. But since I was hesitant to continuously repeat the medication, I searched on the Internet for any possible advice I could get to deal with the situation and I was lucky to find a medical advice service, otherwise I would be panicking. There are many such incidents new immigrants face due to lack of proper information and resources or support.” Fortunately, Sumair, now 7, is doing well and thriving in his new home, as are his parents. Singh shared her experiences as a newcomer parent at Markham’s the Price of Canada Carousel in downtown Markham June 22 at Parenting Expo 2017, Canada’s first-of-its-kind forum for immigrant parents and parents of various ethnic backgrounds....

B.C.’s immigrants giving voice to their own stories

By Joanne Lee-Young, Vancouver Sun | Lino Coria is a Vancouver engineer who develops computer vision algorithms. But to tens of thousands of YouTube users in his native Mexico and across Latin America, he’s better known for talking about the life of his young family in Port Moody. Coria has fans. His wife, Marcela de la Pena, was shopping for Halloween costumes at Value Village in Coquitlam last year when a stranger came up to their daughters, Julia and Emilia, now nine and four-years old. ” ‘Are these Lino Coria’s kids?!’ She had seen them in his videos before she moved here (from Mexico) to study,” said de la Pena. Chatting in Spanish to his followers — about everything from bear-proof garbage cans to grad school programs to choosing public transit over buying another car — helps Coria think about what it means to be an immigrant building a life in B.C. There is growing awareness of the value of hearing and recording stories like Coria’s. They are the kinds of observations that can easily get lost when immigration is examined only through an academic lens, which tends to focus on the historical or economic impact of each successive, major wave of newcomers. Immigrants’ stories told in their own words “are important because it doesn’t always work to see ourselves in the version of history that is jammed from above,” said Henry Yu, a UBC professor of history. Yu said that starting in 1967, the year of Canada’s centennial, there was a pervasive sense “that we are a bilingual nation, English and French, and everyone else is an immigrant....

“Immigration continues to be a key ingredient to our economic future” – Immigration Minister

By Canada Immigration Newsletter Canada’s Minister of Immigration, Ahmed Hussen, recently reaffirmed the country’s commitment to economic immigration during a wide-ranging address in Toronto, Ontario, where he also touched on how the government plans to continue welcoming immigrants from around the world. “The 2017 300,000 landings plan increased the share of economic admissions from the previous year. This is a reflection of our commitment to the idea that immigration continues to be a key ingredient to our economic future as a country,” stated Hussen at the Canadian Bar Association (CBA) law conference, held earlier this month. “In that spirit we’re testing new ideas, we’re introducing new programs, and we’re instituting faster processing that will help Canada to continue to attract the best and the brightest from all over the world to continue to maintain our economic prosperity.” The immigration plan referred to by Mr Hussen is the most recent such plan presented by the government. In this plan, the share of economic immigration within the overall mix increased over the previous year. This was primarily due to the government’s effort to resettle tens of thousands of refugees throughout 2016, and to follow this effort with an increased allocation for economic immigrants in 2017. Towards this end, the minister announced that the target of 300,000 new arrivals annually — historically high by Canadian standards — will actually be the government’s ‘baseline’ for future landings plans. The target could end up being higher than that. Last October, a government advisory group delivered a batch of recommendations to Justin Trudeau’s cabinet, including a recommendation to increase overall immigration levels to 450,000 per...

Undercover investigation unmasks cash-for-jobs Chinese immigration scheme

By Geoff Leo, CBC News  | In his 30 years as an immigration expert, Richard Kurland said he’s only ever heard rumours of people paying money for job offers to foreign nationals. “It’s almost the stuff of immigration legendary myth that there are envelopes of cash being passed around for offers of employment in Canada,” said the Vancouver-based lawyer and immigration policy analyst. But he said a case CBC recently uncovered in Saskatchewan is “the first time on record someone was caught” — as he put it — “green-handed.” In an undercover investigation, CBC’s iTeam recorded an immigration consultant offering to pay a Prince Albert, Sask., business owner cash in exchange for a letter offering a Chinese national a job. And it may, in fact, be part of a larger scam. Last month, a man named Bill Sui dropped by Fabricland in Prince Albert and told owner Barb Reid his company was looking for Canadian jobs to offer to Chinese people wanting to immigrate. According to Reid, Sui told her his immigration consulting company, Vstar International, would pay the salary and benefits of a would-be Chinese immigrant for three months of work if she simply provided a job offer. As an extra incentive, he offered to pay Reid $15,000 in cash. He called it a “training fee.” ‘I’m not trying to hide anything’ The offer raised Reid’s suspicion, so she contacted CBC’s iTeam, saying, “It sounds pretty sketchy and something just can’t be quite legal with the whole process.” CBC recorded two subsequent phone calls between Reid and Sui, who was unaware the calls were being recorded. In one...

Temporary Foreign Worker Program Launches Global Skills Strategy

By McMillan LLP, Lexology | In a recent article, entitled Canada’s Global Skills Strategy to launch June 12, 2017, we advised readers of the Government of Canada’s intention to launch a new Global Skills Strategy aimed at helping companies that are making a significant investment in Canada attract the specialized global talent they need to innovate and grow by providing faster and more predictable immigration service. As promised, on June 12, 2017, the Government launched the Global Skills Strategy, which consists of the following initiatives: 1. New Work Permit Exemption Foreign nationals are now eligible to work in Canada without a work permit for a short duration under the following conditions: The foreign national is coming to Canada: to perform work for 15 consecutive calendar days or less, and six months have passed since the first day of work under the previous use of this exemption (if applicable); or to perform work for 30 days or less, and 12 months have passed since the first day of work under the previous use of this exemption (if applicable); and The foreign national has a job offer for a position in the executive, managerial, or professional national occupation classification. As with applications for entry to Canada under the business visitor exemption, these “short duration” exemption applications are processed at the port of entry by the Canada Border Service Agency and do not have processing fees. 2. New Global Talent Stream Work Permits The Global Talent Stream, which is a two year pilot project, creates two new categories of work permits for highly skilled foreign nationals: Category A is designed for innovative...

London mosque attack suspect made anti-Muslim slurs: neighbours

By Paisley Dodds and Maria Cheng, Globe and Mail | Neighbours and acquaintances described the man who allegedly attacked a group of Muslim worshippers as an unemployed lout who was drinking heavily and making anti-Muslim remarks in the days before the attack — details to be closely examined as the investigation widened Tuesday. The attack unfolded Monday when the alleged assailant, identified by British media as 47-year-old Darren Osborne, drove a rental van into a crowd of Muslim worshippers outside a mosque in the north London neighbourhood of Finsbury Park, an area with a significant Muslim population. The larger Finsbury Park Mosque, which was once associated with several extremist preachers before it was shut down and reformed, is located nearby. Nine people were injured in the attack. One man also died after slipping outside the Muslim Welfare House as evening prayers concluded for the holy month of Ramadan. Makram Ali, 51, died at the scene in his daughter’s arms. She told neighbours that the van had “run over his legs.” Edward Gardiner, who lives in the alleged assailant’s neighbourhood outside the Welsh capital of Cardiff some 150 miles from where the attack occurred, said he called police early Sunday morning to report a man who appeared to be drunk sprawled inside a parked rental van. He said the man appeared to be sleeping across the vehicle’s front three seats with the door open. On Saturday, Osborne had been thrown out of the Hollybush pub after drinking heavily and getting into an argument. “I could smell alcohol on him and he was grunting and groaning,” Gardiner said. “I poked him...