Recent News

Cannes International Emigration & Luxury Property Expo 2017 this October

By Canadian Immigrant Magazine | The Cannes International Emigration & Luxury Property Expo is the world’s leading exhibition dedicated to immigration, luxury real estate and private financial consulting. The event will be held on October 26-27 at the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès in Cannes. The event will bring together corporate exhibitors from 30 countries, including Canada, the U.S.A., Great Britain, Portugal. France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Cyprus, Malta, Switzerland and other EU countries. The list of exhibitors encompasses leading immigration agencies, luxury property developers, law firms, financial consultancies and private banks. The event will be attended by high net worth individuals, including prospective immigrants, international home buyers and entrepreneurs. Visitors will come from the CIS countries, including Russia, Ukraine and Kazakhstan, as well as from China, India, the Middle East and the European Union. Read...

Jobs outlook looks positive in Canada

By Canadian Immigrant Magazine | What direction is the Canadian labour market going? Canadian Immigrant takes a look at current stats, and some of the in-demand professions today and for the future. A positive path To look at the numbers, the jobs outlook in Canada is moving down a positive path. This spring, the labour market saw a strong wave of new jobs, as hiring rose in the private sector, particularly in full-time work, according to Statistics Canada. And the national unemployment rate declined this July to 6.3 per cent. That’s the lowest rate since October 2008, before the onset of the 2008 global economic downturn. Things are looking up. When you look at the past 12 months, employment rose by more than 2.1 per cent, or 353,500 jobs, the bulk of which have been in full-time work. In July alone, the economy created 35,100 full-time jobs while dropping 24,300 part-time jobs. While the job gain in July was actually lower than the average over the previous few months, the numbers point to a healthy labour market. Top job areas There are also more job vacancies. That’s a good sign for newcomers looking for work, but not all industries are alike. Certain areas of the Canadian labour market are more in hiring mode than others. So, what are the top areas overall? Statistics Canada’s July 2017 Labour Force Survey noted a rise in employment in wholesale and retail trade, continuing an upward trend since late 2016. And the number of people working in manufacturing rose by 14,000 this July, the third notable gain in five months. This increase in...

Libraries welcome newcomers with open arms

By Vinh Nguyen | Language barriers and social isolation are among several factors newcomers may experience as they settle in their new environment. Local libraries have developed programs tailored to those needs, such as language clubs and referral services. Libraries in Surrey, Burnaby and Coquitlam offer outreach programs such as interactive ESL and volunteer programs to help them navigate their new community. In hopes of providing support for newcomers, the Government of B.C. created NewToBC services in 2012, bringing the community an active outreach program called the Library Champions Project. In partnership with the Surrey library, this initiative is an outlet for Canadian immigrants who want to help their peers. According to Branka Vlasic, Library Champions Project Trainer, there have been 14 cycles in Surrey with the next on Sept. 15. “Basically, after four training sessions champions outreach in their communities, connecting with newcomers and providing information about library and community services,” says Vlasic. The first training entails the experience of a newcomer in order to identify issues, questions and communication skills. The second training provides library program information to the trainee so they can offer the adequate program to each newcomer. Vlasic says that since the new library champions may have difficulty presenting, public speaking skills are addressed in the third session. Finally in the fourth session, participants learn about community resources and how to do outreach effectively since they will be on their own after they complete their training. Looking back on her time as a facilitator, Vlasic describes her experience as lucky and lovely. “I’m really lucky because I get to meet people who really accomplish...

Trades stigma fading in minority communities

By Chuck Chiang, Business in Vancouver | International students and youth from B.C.’s minority communities may be increasingly warming up to working in the trades, defying traditional perceptions of the sector and potentially providing a much-needed boost to the province’s growing labour shortage. Trades and vocational training institutions around the Lower Mainland are reporting a growing number of international students looking at fields such as heavy mechanical, automotive and automation-related sectors, especially when they compare the labour situation in their home countries (where trades are often not certified and paid as menial labour) with the realities of the Canadian situation. “It is true that international students continue to favour business degrees or other university degree programs, but we are starting to see the number applying to trades programs increase slowly,” said John English, dean of the faculty of applied and technical studies at the University of the Fraser Valley. “Once they learn the culture, the system and the opportunity and the income potential here, they are usually quickly all over it.” Officials say that for immigrant communities whose youth are already well-acclimated Canadian citizens, the idea of trade certification as a viable alternative to a doctoral or master’s degree has long taken root. Brett Griffiths, dean of the school of trades, technology and design at Vancouver Community College, said the days of a trades-program class being predominantly of one ethnicity are long gone. “Generally, the students that we see in the trades are pretty much reflective of the demographics of Vancouver and our school,” Griffiths said. “Our students do come from 40 different countries speaking 30 different languages, and...

Young Immigrants Losing U.S Protections May Look To Canada

By Huffington Post | The White House’s plan to eliminate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program could spur thousands of young undocumented immigrants to head to Canada. On Tuesday, the futures of over 800,000 undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children became a little uncertain after President Donald Trump’s administration announced an end to DACA. “To have a lawful system of immigration that serves the national interest, we cannot admit everyone who would like to come here,” Attorney General Jeff Sessions said at a press conference announcing the decision. Sessions called the decision a result of an “open border policy and the American people have rightly rejected.” He continued, “The nation must set and enforce a limit on how many immigrants we admit each year and that means all can not be accepted.” Immigration lawyer and policy analyst Richard Kurland told Global News that Canada should prepare for a ripple effect as a result of the U.S.’s crackdown on immigration. “It’s really odd. President Trump blamed Mexico for allowing illegal Mexicans entering the United States,” he said, adding Canadian border guards would need a clear plan to handle any possible influx of asylum seekers. Former President Barack Obama was highly critical of the White House’s decision in a scathing post on Facebook. The former president started DACA in 2012 as a way for young immigrants to receive reprieve from the threat of deportation with renewable work permits. Read...