Tri-Cities Local Immigration Partnership

The Tri-Cities Local Immigration Partnership (TCLIP) brings community leaders and organizations together to review the needs of its newest residents and identify means to facilitate immigrant settlement and integration. The ultimate goal of the TCLIP is to develop welcoming and inclusive communities where both long term residents and newcomers feel a sense of belonging and attachment.

Featured Resources

Download and read our latest reports, research, and publications.

Find Immigrant Service Providers in the Tri-Cities

Did you know that Port-Moody, Port-Coquitlam and Coquitlam have many programs and services to help newcomers settle in their new homes. If you are new to the community and would like support, search for programs and services in your area.

Search for Services

Finding vital services for newcomers to the Tri-Cities area is easy thanks to our partnership with NewToBC. This is an organization that helps ease the transition to a new life in British Columbia by listing services that are available to immigrants and refugees in need of a variety of community resources. By visiting the NewToBC site, you will be able to access information and materials, as well as find local services available in your area.

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News & Events

Facebook to ban white nationalism and separatism content

By the Guardian |

Facebook will no longer allow content supporting white nationalism and white separatism, it said on Tuesday. The announcement comes nearly a year after the revelation that its policy against white supremacy and hate speech still let users call for the creation of white ethno-states or claim the US “should be a white-only nation”. read more…

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Demographics

Download demographics details on each community in the Tri-Cities.

Coquitlam

Coquitlam experienced a significant immigrant population increase (17.2%) between 2011 and 2016.

Source: Census 2016

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

Port Coquitlam

43.4% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

In 2016, immigrants represented 48.2% of Coquitlam’s labour force.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

In 2016, Coquitlam was home to the fifth-largest immigrant population (61,060) in the Metro Vancouver Region.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

In 2016, 54.8% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

Port Moody

In 2016, 67.3% of Port Moody’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

Coquitlam

In 2016, China was the largest source country of immigrants to the City of Coquitlam.

Source: Census 2016

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Coquitlam

In 2016, 54.8% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Coquitlam

Refugees made up 11.0% of Coquitlam’s immigrant population and 12.2% of its recent immigrant population.

Source: Census 2016

Port Coquitlam

In 2016, refugees made up 13.8% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrant population.

Source: Census 2016

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Coquitlam

In 2016, immigrants represented 48.2% of Coquitlam’s labour force.

Source: Census 2016

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Port Moody

In 2016, 67.3% of Port Moody’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

Port Coquitlam

In 2016, refugees made up 13.8% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrant population.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

62.8% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrant population arrived under the economic class.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

Coquitlam was home to the fifth-largest immigrant population (61,060) in the Metro Vancouver Region.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

Coquitlam

China was the largest source country of immigrants to the City of Coquitlam.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

Coquitlam was home to the fifth-largest immigrant population (61,060) in the Metro Vancouver Region.

Source: Census 2016

Port Coquitlam

In 2016, refugees made up 13.8% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrant population.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

In 2016, 54.8% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

Port Coquitlam

In 2016, refugees made up 13.8% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrant population.

Source: Census 2016

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Coquitlam

In 2016, 54.8% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

Refugees made up 11.0% of Coquitlam’s immigrant population and 12.2% of its recent immigrant population.

Source: Census 2016

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

Coquitlam

Coquitlam experienced a significant immigrant population increase (17.2%) between 2011 and 2016.

Source: Census 2016

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Port Coquitlam

43.4% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

In 2016, immigrants represented 48.2% of Coquitlam’s labour force.

Source: Census 2016

Port Moody

In 2016, 67.3% of Port Moody’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Coquitlam

In 2016, Coquitlam was home to the fifth-largest immigrant population (61,060) in the Metro Vancouver Region.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

62.8% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrant population arrived under the economic class.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

In 2016, immigrants represented 48.2% of Coquitlam’s labour force.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

In 2016, China was the largest source country of immigrants to the City of Coquitlam.

Source: Census 2016

Port Moody

In 2016, 67.3% of Port Moody’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

China was the largest source country of immigrants to the City of Coquitlam.

Source: Census 2016

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Coquitlam

Refugees made up 11.0% of Coquitlam’s immigrant population and 12.2% of its recent immigrant population.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

In 2016, immigrants represented 48.2% of Coquitlam’s labour force.

Source: Census 2016

Port Moody

In 2016, 67.3% of Port Moody’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

Port Coquitlam

43.4% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

In 2016, immigrants represented 48.2% of Coquitlam’s labour force.

Source: Census 2016

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Coquitlam

In 2016, 54.8% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

Coquitlam was home to the fifth-largest immigrant population (61,060) in the Metro Vancouver Region.

Source: Census 2016

Port Moody

In 2016, 67.3% of Port Moody’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Coquitlam

In 2016, 54.8% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants between the ages of 25 to 64 had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

In 2016, China was the largest source country of immigrants to the City of Coquitlam.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Port Coquitlam

In 2016, refugees made up 13.8% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrant population.

Source: Census 2016

Port Coquitlam

In 2016, refugees made up 13.8% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrant population.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

62.8% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrant population arrived under the economic class.

Source: Census 2016

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Coquitlam

In 2016, Coquitlam was home to the fifth-largest immigrant population (61,060) in the Metro Vancouver Region.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

Coquitlam experienced a significant immigrant population increase (17.2%) between 2011 and 2016.

Source: Census 2016

Coquitlam

China was the largest source country of immigrants to the City of Coquitlam.

Source: Census 2016

Our Members

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