Tri-Cities Local Immigration Partnership

The Tri-Cities Local Immigration Partnership (TCLIP) brings community leaders and organizations together to review the needs of its newest residents and identify means to facilitate immigrant settlement and integration. The ultimate goal of the TCLIP is to develop welcoming and inclusive communities where both long term residents and newcomers feel a sense of belonging and attachment.

Find out more about the TCLIP here.

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Did you know that Port-Moody, Port-Coquitlam and Coquitlam have many programs and services to help newcomers settle in their new homes. If you are new to the community and would like support, search for programs and services in your area.

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News & Events

Immigrants fuel Canada’s high education rates

By The PIE News |

The percentage of degree holders among 25 to 35 year olds is 36% for second generation migrants, compared to 24% for peers with Canadian-born parents.

According to the Immigration Department analysis, this may be down to the fact that many migrants already enter Canada holding university degrees and have high expectations for their children’s academic achievements. In turn this leads to the pursuit of degrees by the next generation.

“Parents’ expectations regarding education matters, and immigrant families, particularly Asian families, tend to have higher educational expectations for their children, on average, than families with Canadian-born parents,” said the report.

Not all source countries fare the same: more than half of second-generation immigrants from China and India hold degrees, compared to about 30 to 37% of those from Western Europe.

Canada was just behind Korea in 2016 as the most educated country in the world according to OECD. Over 60% of its citizens aged 25-34 year old and 42% of 55-64 year olds have university degrees – well above the OECD average.

Around the world, second generation immigrants to the European Union have higher tertiary education attainment rates than their non-immigrant peers, a 2016 Eurostat report showed.

Across the EU, 36% of first generation and 38% of second generation immigrants had post-secondary degrees in 2014, compared to 31% of native-born peers with native background.

However, there were differences between members states.

In the UK, the fifth best-educated country according to OECD, about half of first generation and 47% of second generation migrants had university degrees, compared to 37% of native-born citizens.

In Belgium the percentages were reversed, with native-born citizens 10 percentage points ahead of migrants.

Some member states also showed marked differences between the educational attainment of first and second-generation migrants.

In Spain, Portugal and Italy for example, second generation migrants fared better than their parents, whereas the opposite was true for Luxembourg, Poland and Czech Republic.

Read more

Demographics

Download demographics details on each community in the Tri-Cities.

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

“The Tri-Cities business community is very vibrant and diverse. Working with all facets of community is critical to helping businesses succeed.”

Tri-Cities Chamber of Commerce

Port Coquitlam

45.3% of Port Coquitlam’s immigrants speak non-official languages often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam

Immigrants represent 41.7% of Coquitlam’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

SHARE Family & Community Services

“Developing a strategic plan to aid in the successful settlement on immigrants fits with our focus on building an inclusive and welcoming community.”

SHARE Family & Community Services

Vancity

“We believe in getting involved with organizations that make a difference in their communities. Working with TCLIP is one way for Vancity to give back and support the well-being of Tri-Cities residents.”

Vancity

Port Coquitlam

16,380 immigrants were living in Port Coquitlam in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

School District #43

“Our goal is to provide the most effective services to help parents and students successfully integrate into Canadian society.”

School District #43

City of Coquitlam

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

City of Coquitlam

Douglas College

“Every newcomer faces slightly different challenges, but the more our community understands how to make them feel welcome, the easier the transition can be.”

Douglas College

Port Moody

In 2011, immigrants represented 31.6% of Port Moody’s total population.

Source: 2011 NHS

Fraser Health Authority

“The participation of the health sector is important in the TCLIP initiative as it brings a “health lens” to many discussions and activities.”

Fraser Health Authority

Coquitlam

In 2011, 68.6% of Coquitlam’s recent immigrants spoke non-official languages most often at home.

Source: 2011 NHS

Coquitlam Public Library

“Information is important for everyone in our society. Being able to connect with and communicate the types of services available so that new immigrants can fully take part in society is one of the Library’s mandates.”

Coquitlam Public Library

Avia Employment Services

“We need to learn from each other’s experiences, study the essential settlement needs of newcomers and work in harmony to propose a model that is both efficient and effective.”

Avia Employment Services

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

“We would like to work towards making the Tri-Cities a place where all residents, from newcomers to long-term residents, feel that they belong and can contribute to creating a robust and healthy community.”

S.U.C.C.E.S.S.

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

“With growing diversity, and increased numbers of immigrants and refugees settling in the Tri-Cities, TCLIP provides an invaluable opportunity for ISSofBC to come together with other members of civil society to build a more welcoming and inclusive community.”

Immigrant Services Society of BC (ISSofBC)

Coquitlam

In 2011, 52,080 immigrants were living in Coquitlam.

Source: 2011 NHS

Port Moody

10,390 immigrants were living in Port Moody in 2011.

Source: 2011 NHS

Our Members

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